Thursday, October 18, 2012
Maybe where Romney is most sketchy is on women’s rights. I got a daughter and lost a daughter. I’ve got four granddaughters and Barack has two daughters. And this is to our core. Our daughters and our granddaughters are entitled to every single solitary operation, every single solitary opportunity!” Biden exclaimed, according to a pool report. “And you heard the debate last night. When Governor Romney was asked a direct question about equal pay, he started talking about binders. Whoa! The idea that he had to go and ask where a qualified woman was, he just should have come to my house. He didn’t need a binder. apsies: Biden on ‘binders’ - POLITICO.com   (via dendroica)

(Source: sarahlee310)

Sunday, October 7, 2012 Tuesday, July 31, 2012
eaglebadges:

July 25, 2012
To Bob Mazzuca, Chief Scout Executive and the BSA National Executive Board,
Today I join other Eagle Scouts across the country in renouncing my ties to the Boy Scouts of America and returning my Eagle Scout badge. 
I recently moved back to Seattle - where I spent 8 years as a member of Troop 15 and became an Eagle Scout in 1995 – and being here has brought me nostalgia for the joy and learning of my Scouting experience.  The hikes in the North Cascades and Olympic mountains, the weekly meetings filled with unique friendships, the lessons learned with each merit badge I earned and each Eagle Scout project I contributed to.  I eventually became one of the elders in my troop, staying on as Junior Assistant Scoutmaster and teaching new members in the troop the skills I had learned as a young Scout.  These are things I am proud of.
I am not proud to be affiliated with an organization that excludes people based on their sexuality.  Many of my closest friends are gay, lesbian or transgender and it pains me to think that I invested time in an organization that prohibits their membership.  It’s a shameful, bigoted policy, plain and simple. 
I now have a son with a disability who uses a wheelchair.  I am humbled by the legacy of the disability rights movement, which challenged bias and brought more accessibility and dignity to people like my son; and I am humbled by other struggles like the civil rights movement, the feminist and gay liberation movements.  It gives me strength to know that people have fought for and won battles against our society’s most pernicious forms of prejudice, in the same way that it appalls me that the Boy Scouts remain on the wrong side of history.  I’m sending in my badge to be on the right side; I know that eventually the LGBT rights movement will win out, and I want to do my part. 
In truth I should have returned my badge more than a decade ago when the Supreme Court ridiculously ruled that the BSA had the right to exclude people based on sexual orientation.  I had thought, like many others, that efforts at reform from the inside would lead to a change in course.  But the recent decision by the BSA to uphold that policy makes it clear that bigotry has been institutionalized and that there is no longer any hope for change.  The power of fundamentalist, anti-gay, religious institutions over the BSA has been too much for even a well-crafted citizens campaign to overcome.
So I am attaching my Eagle Scout badge and certificate and sending them back to the Boy Scout headquarters.  Others have already taken this step and many more will join.  And hopefully someday a new organization will be born that not only gives young boys (and girls) the opportunity to hike and explore the outdoors, but also teaches them to respect and love other people, regardless of how our society choses to classify them.
Sincerely,
Michael Burke Stansbury


This whole movement is amazing

eaglebadges:

July 25, 2012

To Bob Mazzuca, Chief Scout Executive and the BSA National Executive Board,

Today I join other Eagle Scouts across the country in renouncing my ties to the Boy Scouts of America and returning my Eagle Scout badge. 

I recently moved back to Seattle - where I spent 8 years as a member of Troop 15 and became an Eagle Scout in 1995 – and being here has brought me nostalgia for the joy and learning of my Scouting experience.  The hikes in the North Cascades and Olympic mountains, the weekly meetings filled with unique friendships, the lessons learned with each merit badge I earned and each Eagle Scout project I contributed to.  I eventually became one of the elders in my troop, staying on as Junior Assistant Scoutmaster and teaching new members in the troop the skills I had learned as a young Scout.  These are things I am proud of.

I am not proud to be affiliated with an organization that excludes people based on their sexuality.  Many of my closest friends are gay, lesbian or transgender and it pains me to think that I invested time in an organization that prohibits their membership.  It’s a shameful, bigoted policy, plain and simple. 

I now have a son with a disability who uses a wheelchair.  I am humbled by the legacy of the disability rights movement, which challenged bias and brought more accessibility and dignity to people like my son; and I am humbled by other struggles like the civil rights movement, the feminist and gay liberation movements.  It gives me strength to know that people have fought for and won battles against our society’s most pernicious forms of prejudice, in the same way that it appalls me that the Boy Scouts remain on the wrong side of history.  I’m sending in my badge to be on the right side; I know that eventually the LGBT rights movement will win out, and I want to do my part. 

In truth I should have returned my badge more than a decade ago when the Supreme Court ridiculously ruled that the BSA had the right to exclude people based on sexual orientation.  I had thought, like many others, that efforts at reform from the inside would lead to a change in course.  But the recent decision by the BSA to uphold that policy makes it clear that bigotry has been institutionalized and that there is no longer any hope for change.  The power of fundamentalist, anti-gay, religious institutions over the BSA has been too much for even a well-crafted citizens campaign to overcome.

So I am attaching my Eagle Scout badge and certificate and sending them back to the Boy Scout headquarters.  Others have already taken this step and many more will join.  And hopefully someday a new organization will be born that not only gives young boys (and girls) the opportunity to hike and explore the outdoors, but also teaches them to respect and love other people, regardless of how our society choses to classify them.

Sincerely,

Michael Burke Stansbury

This whole movement is amazing

Next week, while we’re all watching NBC, a nuclear-powered, MINI-Cooper-sized super rover will land on Mars. We accurately guided this monster from 200 million miles away (that’s 7.6 million marathons). It requires better accuracy than an Olympic golfer teeing off in London and hitting a hole-in-one in Auckland, New Zealand. It will use a laser to blast rocks, a chemical nose to sniff out the potential for life, and hundreds of other feats of near-magic. Will these discoveries lead us down a path to confirming life on other planets? Wouldn’t that be a good story that might make people care about science? But telling us this story means more than just the composition of the rocks (sorry, Mars geologists). It’s about the team that makes it happen.

No one producing an Olympic teaser asks, “What’s the importance of 100 meters?” No, they tell us about the athletes who dedicate their lives to running the race, because dedication and triumph are what make a human running 100 meters interesting. If NBC can get us all misty-eyed about 100 meters, imagine what NASA could do with 200 million miles.

The Mars race is about human survival and understanding our place in a vast and terrifyingly beautiful universe. And the stories of its athletes (mathletes?) should be world-class, because they accomplish near-impossible tasks on a cosmic scale — the hardest sport you could ever compete in. It requires dedication and doggedness that only the most passionate people in the universe could deliver. Unfortunately, this drama plays out behind closed doors. We won’t have insights into the sacrifice, scandal, discovery, divorce, hardship, and drama that it takes to work for a decade delivering a one-ton super rover to another planet. It’s the biggest irony that the most junior engineer at NASA is fearless in the face of trying to send a robot to Mars, but the career bureaucrats are afraid to tell that engineer’s story of failure or success.

NASA will say that they’re doing the best they can and stretching their education and outreach budgets to the max. But if they hope to stay in business, they need to tell us how they’re pushing the limits of humanity with over-the-top, risky-ass missions that will answer questions about who we are as a species on this planet.

Andrew Kessler, The Huffington Post. Why You Should Be More Interested in Mars Than the Olympics.

Kessler, who spent ninety days inside NASA to write Martian Summer: Robot Arms, Cowboy Spacemen and My 90 Days with the Phoenix Mars Mission, believes the agency is “so frightened of failure that they’re willing to sacrifice their greatest asset: the ability to inspire.” In other words, they no longer tell a good story.

Know who could help? Kick ass science journalists.

Sidenote: AAAS Kavli Science Journalism Awards applications are due tomorrow.

(via futurejournalismproject)

Although landing on mars and possibly discovering life on another planet is mind blowing, so is the fact that I was completely invested in a water polo match the other day… Basically can’t we do both?

Tuesday, July 24, 2012

I’m Sure It’s Just A Coincidence…

progressivefriends:

US Poverty Heads To Highest Level In 50 Years

Rich Hide Up To 32 TRILLION In Off Shore Tax Havens

Nothing to do with each other! Ha

Monday, July 23, 2012
nevver:

Data never sleeps


I love graphs, charts and really any data presented in an aesthetically pleasing way

nevver:

Data never sleeps

I love graphs, charts and really any data presented in an aesthetically pleasing way

I like this